Experience the Best of Summer During Your Japan Trip

Since Japan is located in the northern hemisphere, summer begins on June 21 and ends on September 21. During the summer season, it is very humid, and the temperature can rise up to 40 degrees.

With so much heat, this is the ideal occasion to visit the beaches, cool off with ice cream, and have fun. During this period, you can also appreciate beautiful landscapes covered in green, sometimes decorated with flowers of sunflowers, which is a characteristic flower of summer. You can also enjoy many seasonal fruits such as watermelon, melon, and peaches at Japan holiday destinations.

Japan holiday destinations

Summer is also the best season to see the fireworks since during this season there are many festivals throughout the country. In these festivals, you can see dance performances like the “Bon Odori” in addition to many stalls where they sell a variety of foods such as Takoyaki and Okonomiyaki. At the end of the festival, the sky is decorated with all the fireworks.

Bon Odori is a traditional Japanese dance festival. This festival is celebrated in Japan every summer and organized locally by each city.

During Bon Odori, people gather in open spaces around a tower with taiko drums and dance to the beat of traditional music. Music should be joyful to welcome the souls of the ancestors, and people should maintain a cheerful mood. The Bon Odori must be celebrated during the night because it is believed that the souls of the ancestors return during the night.

The refreshing wipes

In the same way that in winter we have available the ‘hot patches’ to combat the Japanese cold, to appease the heat of the Japanese summer you just need to go to some drugstore (like the ubiquitous Matsumoto Kiyoshi) and buy refreshing wipes, which give a great feeling of freshness. The refreshing wipes are usually marked with the word ice, like the Gatsby Ice Type, quite frequent and easy to find.

Summer festivals

The summer festivals or Natsumatsuri are probably one of the best things about luxury destinations in Japan. At summer festivals we can enjoy traditional dances (such as the Awa Odori in Tokushima  or the Sansa Odori in Morioka), enjoy the traditional music of the taiko percussion and the flutes was, hallucinate with the parades of floats and traditional costumes (like the great Gion Matsuri floats in Kyoto, the illuminated floats of the NebutaMatsuri in Aomori or the acrobatics with the Kanto Matsuri lanterns in Akita), blind us to typical food of the matsuri(as yakisoba, yakitori , okonomiyaki , etc.) and see many people in yukata or summer kimonos.

luxury destinations in Japan

Fireworks

Another feature of the Japanese summer are fireworks (Hanabi) and large fireworks competitions (Hanabitaikai), which towns and cities of Japan organize to celebrate the arrival of summer and in which different pyrotechnics they compete to see who manages to mount a bigger and better fireworks show, with fireworks of colors and impressive and innovative forms.

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Travel Japan – The 8 Mistakes To Avoid During Your Stay

Travel Japan – If you plan to go to Japan soon or you are already there, you should know that the luxury destinations in Japan is highly codified. Many rules of conduct are followed and sometimes foreigners, mostly ignorantly, do not apply them.

  1. Avoid giving tip

If giving advice is more or less the norm in Europe and even more in the United States, this is not the case in Japan. Also if the service was excellent, do not leave your money because, at best, it will be a gesture that we will not understand. But most often, it is seen as a scornful and arrogant act.

  1. Not completing the dish

The Japanese do not spoil anything when cooking and try to use all the ingredients at their disposal without throwing anything away. So, they are waiting for us to do the same when we eat the dishes they serve us.

And it’s right in restaurants but also when you are invited to Japanese friends. So try not to leave anything on your plate, leave to eat slowly and order as you go.

  1. Eating or drinking in the streets

There is no law, but it is indeed awful to eat or drink on the road, especially to walk. This is also the case in the subway where the Japanese avoid eating there for the sake of cleanliness. To eat a sandwich, it is advisable to stop on a bench for example and eat well in peace, without risk of dirtying or embarrassing someone.

  1. Crossing pedestrian when the light is red

Pedestrian lights should be respected all over the world, but in Japan this rule is followed religiously. And “gaijin” (foreigners) are often seen as troublemakers because they are used to crossing the street at any time. So try to avoid doing this to prevent dirt and accusing looks.

  1. No Physical Contact

In Japan, we most often avoid physical contact and we say hello without touching. Forgetting the tightening of hands even if it is still tolerated in the workplace for example. On the other hand, kissing girls, you remember because it will scare them more than anything else. Same for the slaps on the shoulder.

  1. Entering house or temple with shoes

In most Japan holiday destinations and inside temples, it is customary to take off your shoes to show respect for the place. Do not do it is indeed seen as a drama! In a Japanese house, the family will give you slippers to walk inside the house. If you want to go to the washroom, there are some kinds of sandals to wear instead of slippers inside the toilet.

  1. Not Queueing

It may seem natural, but lining up in Japan is really important to respect. If you are not queuing then it might be comfortable for many.

  1. Pointing a finger

Even if it is to designate someone without evil intentions, it is insulting to look someone in Japan. It is usually an accusatory gesture to avoid entirely.

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